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20130822
20130830
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learned that our adversaries were moving to nonmetallic devices. we adapted our screening technology and tactics to counter that. learned that a single vulnerability in any part of the aviation system can make everyone connected to it vulnerable. since we don't control security at foreign airports, we have to work even more closely with international partners to raise the overall security of the system. we did that. shortly after the christmas day plot, i launched a worldwide initiative to make these needed changes in close collaboration with our strongest allies. i am proud to say that i october of 2010, this effort led to 190 countries signing onto an historic agreement to improve aviation security, standards, and technology and information sharing. i have had the chance to visit many of those countries over the past 4.5 years. continentscross six -- however, our work did not end there. following the 20 10 air cargo threat which involved bombs hidden inside printer cartridges departing on international planes to the united states, we launched a second initiative to work with intern
technology that would produce the steel for less than half the price. these big ingots take specialties that can be used in high-tech industries. they got the money together, they converted, and they are the fifth largest steel company in employees.0 the average pay was $85,000 a year. it never made it to television. i believe we lost the election in that moment. there were other, institutional reasons why we did not do it. we have to understand those and make sure it does not happen again. the romney campaign was out of money because they spent it all in the primary. they had a lot of money earmarked for the general election and they could not spend it until after the republican convention. all of the money could not be spent except for a portion of it on political communication. they've ran negative issue ads against obama tom a -- against obama, but they never felt able to answer the bain capital for fear of the tax exempt status. i kept telling them the irs would cut you slack.but those accountants did not believe me. let's make sure we don't make the same mistake again because we c
and maintaining our technological upgradinge are not our roads and our bridges and our transportation systems in our infrastructure, all things that we can afford to do right now and should be doing right now and would put people to work right now -- if we don't do those things, then 20 years from now, already years from now, we will have fallen further and further behind. when we get back to washington, when congress gets back to washington, this is going to be a major debate. this is the same debate we have been having for the last two years. the difference is now the ready coming down here what we should be thinking about is how do we grow an economy so that we are creating a thriving middle class and more ladders of opportunity for those who are willing to work hard to get into the middle class. and my position is going to be that we can have a budget that is sensible, that is not spent on programs that don't work, but it does spend wisely on those things that will help ordinary people succeed. all right? good. -- it is a general mental the turn. this gentleman right here has had his hand
and technology and infrastructure, our borders are now better staffed and better protected than at any time in our nations history. it illegal crossings have dropped to 40-year lows. we also set commonsense immigration priorities with a focus on criminals, national security and public safety threats, repeat offenders, and egregious emigration file leaders. last year, we remote more serious criminals from the united states than at any time in our history. we strengthened our work to combat transnational criminal organizations including those that commit cyber crime and financial fraud, violate international property and prey upon human life. as part of our effort, we established the dhs loop campaign to unify the departments work to fight the worldwide scourge of human trafficking. while important, we still need to make sure that future changes we needed to make further changes to create a more flexible, fair, and focused emigration system. we instructed our immigration agents and officers to use their discretion under current law to not pursue low priority immigration cases. like children b
that process is underway and has been underway and will continue moving forward. you said russia technologies that chemical weapons were used. a spokesman for cameron said -- and putin said they did not have evidence that chemical weapons use had been taking place. you to the past indications that the use of chemical weapons on august 21 was acknowledged broadly by nations around the world, including russia and iran. i do not see that statement. but it comes to this particular matter and that conflict in as muche have not seen cooperation from russia as we and many nations would like, but on the statement i do not have response because i have not seen it. >> at the moment [indiscernible] i do not have a schedule for you. obviously, the g-20 is being used in sync peter sure, russia host nation. as you know, we decided against a bilateral summit in moscow with president putin. >> would it be bilateral? >> i do not have a schedule of what our meetings look like. we are going to st. petersburg for the g-20. >> thank you. do you know if in his include thes americans who are believed to be held by
also held top positions at the massachusetts institute of technology and the george washington university. right,-- to my far andrew young, an aide to martin luther king. young helped organize the march on washington. in addition he was a former congressman, a former mayor of atlanta, and a former ambassador to the united issues. he is currently professor at the andrew young skill -- school of policy studies at georgia state. ifill,eft, gwen reporter, moderator and managing "washington week vicehe has moderated two presidential debates, and before that she worked for nbc, and "the washington post," and she is regarded as one of the best. my right, julian bond, one of the leaders of the civil rights movement. studentd found the nonviolent coordinating committee. he was also elected to the georgia house and senate. he has been a radio and television almond tater and is a professor at both american university and the university of virginia. , a manmmediate left described as the conscience of the u.s. congress among john lewis, a congressman from georgia since 1986. at 23, 1 of the
success of that march encouraged other people to do the same thing. secondly, almost every technological change since then from satellite television to arena video screens and sound systems have made marches more accessible, just more feasible. you see the cascading number of marches to the point where the noted martin luther king the type hass, been debased by repetition. asx significant difference we have listened to a number of oral histories, the organizational work it took to put this work together with more than 200,000 in the sum estimated 250,000, well before e-mail and twitter and other social media, this is truly a grassroots effort. a lot has changed in terms of ideology 50 years later. has that impacted the value of these marches? klux guest: carried topeech was nations around the world by satellite, and broadcast live on the only three broadcast networks, today, it would take in a norma's event to get that kind of attention. get thatus event to kind of attention. people's attention span for various reasons has been so changed, that you really have to fight to break through t
health care system. we invested in new technologies. we started reversing our addiction to foreign oil. we changed a tax code that was tilted to far in favor of the wealthy at the expense of working families. and add it all up, today our businesses have created 7.3 million new jobs over the last 41 months. we now generate more renewable energy than ever before. we sell more goods made in america to the rest of the world than ever. health care costs are growing at the slowest rate in 50 years. our deficits are falling at the fastest rate in 60 years. here in buffalo, the governor and the mayor were describing over a billion dollars in investment, riverfront being changed, construction booming -- signs of progress. so thanks to the grit and the resilience of the american people, we've cleared away the rubble from the financial crisis. we've started to lay the foundation for a stronger, more durable economic growth. but as any middle-class family will tell you, as folks here in buffalo will tell you, we're not where we need to be yet. because even before the crisis hit -- and it sounds li
investing in science and technology to train young people of all races for the jobs of tomorrow and to act on what we learned about our bodies, our businesses, and our climates. we must push open those stubborn gates. we cannot be discouraged by a supreme court decision that said we don't need this critical provision of the voting rights act because look at the states. it made it harder for armies and hispanics and students and elderly and infirm and poor working folks to vote. what do you know? they showed up, stood in line for hours and voted anyway. so obviously we don't need any kind of law. [applause] >> but a great democracy does not make it harder to vote than to buy an assault weapon. [applause] we must open those stubborn gates. let us not forget that while racial divides persist and must not be denied, the whole american landscape is littered with lost dreams and dashed ,opes of people of all races and the great irony of the current moment is that the future has never brimmed with more possibilities. it has never burned brighter in what we could become. if we pushed open those st
and the technology area, the people invested generally the table with money to invest, were able to benefit from it. then you have the decline at the end of the london administration and on into the getting of the bush and administration, and then you and the bush menstruation with an economic downtown -- downturn, and you will see that the attribution actually flattens. because the people with money and with investments and to bear a bigger share of the economic downturn. years,ke it up in the up but they lose in the down years. so you actually see the kind of perverse results. this time around and in this economic upturn, we really have not seen that same type of a dynamic. and so if we really want to address the income distribution -- and to remember, clinton taxes, any distribution got more disparate. not because he raised taxes, ok, because taxes are not the way to address the distribution. the way to address the distribution is through fundamental skill levels, education and a vibrant economy. of income the shares held by the various income quintiles, and we see the share of taxes. taxn, you
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10